First Rarity

distant Tropical Kingbird digiscoped out over
the “River of Grass”

I was driving home from Miami and decided to pull off at the boat launch into the WMA just West of Krome Avenue at the edge of the Everglades. It can be a great spot to view for Snail Kites and other Florida specialty species.  While I didn’t see any of those, I did see a yellow bellied kingbird species wing by and make an abrupt “Ki-Ki, Krrrrrr!” call. I knew instantly what it was, a Tropical Kingbird, and I watched as it continued back out across the canal, then the busy highway and finally settling at the top of a taller bush here.

distant Tropical Kingbird digiscoped out over the "River of Grass"

distant Tropical Kingbird digiscoped out over
the “River of Grass”

I first pulled out my scope and took some quick images to document the birds occurrence. They were shot at great distance over water so are far from my best work, but my whole intent was to simply document the bird’s occurrence which these do just fine. Having now personified the Traveling Trinovid my next thought was, I’d better take a look at these through “Travis” so he can have this bird for his list. The reality is that most “rare” birds are not as much rare as they are far from their normal range. Tropical Kingbirds as an example, are abundant and easily seen throughout central America. Chances are you won’t even make it out of the airport parking lot without seeing one actually on any Central American birding trip. However, here in Florida it is not a bird you expect to see when you go out for a typical day of birding. So I pulled out the new star of the show and looked at this “rare” bird to Florida through the Trinovids which were riding in a position of honor in the passenger seat.

IMG_2765

Eastern Screech-Owl
Port Charlotte, Florida April 8, 2013

I couldn’t resist using them again to get the “first Owl” for the list when I discovered my resident male Eastern Screech-Owl’s daily roosting spot the following morning.

So, with these few additional bird sightings, a grand total of 45 species of birds had been viewed with the Traveling Trinovids by the end of day 3 of this binocular big year, with loads more to see!